Monday, September 24, 2007

you kids and your "music"


To the sign-maker's credit, I also have little appreciation for the music that others choose to share loudly from their cars. Karla (who goes by Karlita in LJ) submitted this great example of questionable sarcasm. Incidentally, where I come from we say "turn it down" instead of "put"; is this a regionalism? (this photo taken in Arizona)

18 comments:

silverbear said...

I live in Arizona, and we say "turn the music down" just like everyone else. Maybe the person who wrote this sign was using the word music as a weird metaphor for gun and advising people to disarm before entering.

Elizabeth said...

I suspect "put" is an Engrish-ism.

marla said...

The music is so bad it needs to be put out of its own misery.

Philipp said...

"music". Well it is a matter of fact that the older generations don't really consider "new" musical genres as music. So I think that "music" with quoation marks is okay in that case, isn't it?
Put down music -- that's new to me, too.

merlallen said...

Dude, don't ever try to read Kaye, Grogan.
She would have you screaming.

DK said...

Um, I think they just did put the music down with their implication right there...

nix said...

alarm! i hope this is not a sign in which "music" = pet dog (or something).

Antique Mommy said...

Maybe they mean that the music should be "put" down like an injured horse or a sick dog thereby putting us all out of our misery.

bluessinger said...

there is a kindred spirit at http://phonatical.wordpress.com/

halfanhourwithsue said...

Hey, sign-makers should have possession of credit as in sign-maker's credit.

MaxwellDemon said...

What about "In Respect for others"? There's a lot of wrong in one sentence here.

bethany said...

Sue - you're right. good catch. I fixed it.

john said...

I think they mean to insult your music.

"Music, you're so bad, the only reason you have a beat is because of how much yo momma spanked you."

Amy said...

My husband was raised in New York, and he and his family say things like "put the tv on" or "put in fan on" instead of turn said item on... LOL. It blows my mind.

bethany said...

Amy - that's the sort of thing I was fishing for. Here in the south they say "cut the light on". At first I thought they were insane.

Anonymous said...

I think of rap as "music," rather than music. I think this one may actually be getting at something.

drew said...

We say cut here in NE Tennessee. Cut it on, cut it off, cut it down, stop cutting up. etc etc

Dana said...

I agree with Amy's info. I think the use of "put" in this context would stem from a culture that adopted English in the last hundred years or so. Here in Middle Tennessee, I have usually heard "turn", but also "cut" at times. In a related note, my Dad once pointed out a glitch in a TV Western show, set in the 1800s. One guy observed "There's a light on in the barn." My Dad observed that before electricity, the statement would have been merely "There's a light in the barn." without the word "on" being included. That "on" was added with the light switch having on and off positions for turning the light on or off. Actually, with kerosene lamps, you would "put" a light out, as in "put out that light". Hmmm, maybe it's more complex than I thought?!