Thursday, October 18, 2007

"tea" party


Chris asks if he should drink this tea, as it is called Herbal "Tea" here AND "Herbal Tea". It makes it sound like maybe you should dissolve it, but I would still steep it if I try it at all.

17 comments:

Eaquae Legit said...

Actually this one makes sense to me, as herbal "teas" are not teas at all, but tisanes. We call them "tea" but they don't actually have any tea leaves in them.

trent said...

Plus, as it says "Artificial Sassafras Flavour" up in the top right corner, even the quotes around "Herb Tea" make sense.

Still, I don't think I'd drink it.

Dexty said...

I dunno the "tea" qoute seems a little "silly"

eleKtrofly said...

i went to a gym once with a sign which read: "Member's Workout Room's"

i tried to explain to the proprietor that both apostrophes were misplaced but he seemed painfully ambivalent.

Charity Childs Gevero said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sean McGoldrick said...

Just found your blog in the course of random surfing. Excellent idea!

Watoosa said...

I just discovered your blog and am greatly enjoying it. However, you may be interested to know that it is grammatically correct to place commas, periods, and semicolons inside quotation marks (see CMA). Alternately, colons go outside question marks, and exclamation points and question marks are relative to meaning. That is American style. British style differs, so if you are not using American style, my apologies.

bethany said...

I was taught by a Canadian, so I am always confused. I decided for this blog that I would use punctuation INSIDE for things that are actual quotations, and OUTSIDE for ironic quotation marks. I believe that is british/canadian style but it makes more sense to me, and I figure as long as you're consistent...

vikkitikkitavi said...

I'm sorry, but I think pretty much everyone on earth has accepted that herbal teas seldom contain actual leaves from the tea plant. It's a figure of speech already, get over it.

suchsimplepleasures said...

so, is that telling us that it isn't really tea? this is an hysterical blog! i came here from another blog and i'm so glad i did! this made my day!

Jeff said...

@Vikki:

That would certainly make the quotes unnecessary, then, wouldn't it?

Anonymous said...

Maybe it's really just pot.

Chris said...

It doesn't matter if it contains tea leaves or not.

Mountain Dew does not contain dew from mountains. :)

Besides the word tea has become one of those words that has become so common that it can be -- and is -- used in a generic form. Just as people call any plastic bandage a Band Aid, or any petroleum jelly Vaseline, or any fabric hook and loop fastener Velcro, they likewise call any drink that is made by steeping chopped up dried bits of any botanical plant in water tea.

You give a thousand random people that definition and 999 of them will call it tea regardless of whether or not there are any tea leaves in the drink.

For the record I did drink it. It tastes something like root beer. It's not my (dare I say it?) cup of tea! ;) :)

vv said...

Does the bag actually say "'Losse' 'Herb Tea'," or am I crazy?

Chris said...

No. The font used on the bag is one that is difficult to distinguish an "S" from an "O" especially when it is very small as in this case. But the word "Loose" is spelled correctly.

Anonymous said...

It's a regulation on selling tea (set by some government or another). If you say that something is tea, it must either contain the leaves of, or have been brewed from, Camellia sinensis. If it is not made from those leaves, it can be called "herbal tea" or "tea" (with the quotes). It can alternatively be called tisane or herbal infusion (without quotes).

Clara said...

IT is "GOOD". I congratulate you on taking care about these small matters which we often dont observe. Just found your blog in the course of random surfing. Excellent idea!