Tuesday, February 26, 2008

there's "nothing wrong with it"


I wonder if the skydiving is always voluntary, from this "perfectly good airplane"? Thanks to Gruen, who saw this in Key West.

21 comments:

jennifer h said...

This may be my favorite yet. And I always wanted to try sky-diving. I think I'll shop around.

Rebekah said...

Even if you ignore the quotation mark misuse, what is that supposed to mean?

Stu said...

Actually, in this case, that's not all that crazy. "Perfectly good airplane" is a quote, more or less. I'm not sure the origin of it, but "Why would anyone jump out of a perfectly good airplane?" is kind of a cliche amongst skydivers.

This seems a legitimate, if a bit obtuse, use of quotes.

sitboaf said...

Great insight, stu.
However, I believe is it poor business practice to use an inside joke to generate business among new customers.

Not quite the Bradys said...

I think Bethany got it wrong this time. (No offense, B.) I don't wonder if sky diving from a "perfectly good airplane" is intentional. I think a "perfectly good airplane" is exactly the sort you INTENTIONALLY hurl yourself from- at least it would be for me.

bethany said...

that's what I was going for, nqtb. Nothing is as un-funny as an unclear joke. I apologize.

adrienne said...

I'm with Stu. The quotes are appropriate as they directly reference a cliche.

bethany said...

I agree with stu that it's a bit obtuse, and with sitboaf that it is hence bad business practice. Behold: many of us think it is funny an ominous.

Jeff said...

FWIW, I've never heard that cliche. If I was looking to skydive, I may just skip this company...

What's that they're always saying about "if you have to explain the joke..."

Anonymous said...

Obtuse joke or not, why is "perfectly" capitalized? And "see" is not? Even if I was interested in sky diving, describing it as 2 miles up at 120 MPH would probably make me change my mind. Yikes!

john said...

i agree they're referencing the cliche, but it's still pretty funny. it'd be a little funnier if they said something like "our aircraft are 'perfectly safe'!"

Anonymous said...

i can't believe they actually put that on a pamphelet designed to entice people to trust them to help fulfull their thrill-seeking fantasies! although maybe that's more offputting to me since i find the whole concept pretty offputting. i'd rather try heroin.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps a better choice would be to ask if they're ready to try "jumping from a perfectly good airplane?" That would include enough of the cliché to be obvious. Regardless, the capitalization is egregious. :)

Joel, Sarah, and Eliza said...

I have actually seen the airplane that people dive out of for this and it is AWFUL. So the quotation marks are definitely necessary here.

Andi said...

This one made me laugh out loud, literally. I kind of get the joke, now that all the commenters have explained it, but I still dontt care. It's just a funny use of QMs there.

Anonymous said...

It's specifically from a now-widespread Air Force joke about paratroopers: "Marines are so dumb they'll jump out of a perfectly good airplane."

A lot of people interested in skydiving would have heard it, so it's being used here both as an injoke to get 'em interested and in the right mood, AND to say that the teachers are experienced.

But yes, it can be misunderstood without context....

--Nonie Rider

Debbie said...

I've been skydiving and people's incredulous response to that revelation is "Why would anyone want to jump out of a perfectly good airplane?" I vote the quotes are necessary. :)

John said...

I have been a skydiver for 12 years and my opinion is that the quotes are appropriate. That phrase is the exasperation-inspiring reaction of most non-jumpers to first learning someone they meet is a skydiver. It is such a cliche that the civilian-skydiver slang for a non-jumper is "whuffo," in reference to the question: "Whuffo you guys jump out of those perfectly good airplanes?"

By the way, there are two standard answers to the question:

1. There is no such thing as a perfectly good airplane.

2. If there was such a thing as a perfectly good airplane, skydiving would never have been invented in the first place.

Klondike said...

Yeah, it's a cliche among skydivers (like me). I don't understand how it's such a universal thing, but it is. Similarly, as a unicyclist, I hear "Where's your other wheel??" so often it's incredulous.

pantaloonfan said...

Not really an inside joke. I think it was in Full Metal Jacket, possibly... I've heard it in several places, and I don't skydive.

In that sense, it's poorly framed but it is a quotation at least.

catruler said...

4FUN? Is that like 4KIDS? Are they dubbing skydiving?