Wednesday, November 28, 2007

"Sweet Shave"


Not so sweet
Originally uploaded by mirthmobile
Found on the wall at my favorite local BBQ place, this sign lets us know that quotes used to create either emphasis or sarcasm have been with us for a long time.
Now you're on the trolley.

9 comments:

Ceci said...

I think these might actually be scare quotes - it's a "sweet shave" because they are Gold'n Honey-brand razors. After some thought it seems to me like these aren't actually inappropriately placed.

bethany said...

I never understand what people mean when they say something is "scare quotes" and therefore justified. I managed to get a BA in english without ever being told what exactly ARE "scare quotes"?

Karen said...

I don't know what "scare quotes" are either, but if you say it three times really fast, it comes out "scarecrows". Just sayin'.

Bob K said...

I actually think ceci might have something here which I overlooked at first. Scare quotes are when one uses quotes for purposes other than quoting someone. Using quotes instead of the words "so-called" or "alleged" which is the fun of this blog - to assume people mean that when they don't. In this case, though, as ceci correctly points out, they are meant to indicate a pun. Does this make them "scare quotes?" I'm not sure. However, because they indicate a pun they might be a correct use of quotes - or at least a "correct" use.

Jeff said...

^
I'll say it again:

If you have to point out the pun, it's no that good.

Maya said...

I wonder why they're called "scare" quotes, but I agree with Ceci, that the "sweet shave" are appropriate. Just because they are appropriate does not mean they are necessary--I think the pun was cute and didn't need to be pointed out. But then, it wouldn't have been posted, and what would we all have talked about?

Sawdust said...

I wonder if the quotes would be better placed only around "sweet". For a "sweet" shave...

Another question, though, is what's the deal with shortening "golden" to "gold'n"?! :-)

Anonymous said...

gosh, i'm just really curious about the specifics of a sweet shave. why does it seem kinda risque?

Bob K said...

I too wondered why they're called "scare" quotes so I went to the OED and, while I don't have an answer, I found that one of the obscure meanings for "scare" is "disdain." Perhaps that is a clue to why scare is used in this way.